News

Covid Recovery News: Can taking vitamins and supplements help you recover from COVID 19 – Can taking vitamins and supplements help you recover from corona infection? Learn

Covid Recovery News: Can taking vitamins and supplements help you recover from COVID 19 – Can taking vitamins and supplements help you recover from corona infection?  Learn
Written by Arindam
Covid Recovery News: Can taking vitamins and supplements help you recover from COVID 19 – Can taking vitamins and supplements help you recover from corona infection?  Learn

Brisbane/Robina (Australia): Due to the spurt in cases of Kovid in Australia this year, many people have been seen looking for ways to protect themselves from the disease or boost their immunity. Since then, there has been a boom in the sale of dietary supplements. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration places vitamins, minerals, amino acids, enzymes, plant extracts and microbiome supplements under ‘feeding supplements’. The global estimated value of the complementary medicine industry in 2020 was approximately $170 billion. Complementary medicines revenue in Australia was estimated at $6.69 billion in 2021 – more than doubled in the past decade.

The latest figures show that 73% of Australians bought complementary medicines in the past year, with vitamins accounting for more than half of that. But how likely are these purchases to be effective in preventing or treating COVID? Fear, Avoidance and Laboratory Studies Historically, the public has purchased supplements from sources that also provide health care advice. Health messages about lockdown, social distancing and personal hygiene have now become a part of normal life. That’s why people are shopping online for supplements and turning to the Internet, friends, or social media for vitamin recommendations.

Get information about potential benefits and harms from reliable sources
For some, this has led to an unhealthy fear of covid (coronaphobia) and a negative impact on daily life. As with any medicine, consumers should seek information from reliable sources (doctors, pharmacists or evidence-based peer-reviewed articles) about the potential benefits and harms of supplements before purchase. Strong evidence supports that vaccination reduces the risk of severe COVID-19. Researchers have also looked to see whether supplements can prevent or reduce the duration and severity of this viral infection by enhancing the immune response. Susceptibility to any infection, including COVID, increases when our body lacks essential nutrients that strengthen the immune system (Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Zinc and Selenium). But there is little evidence that taking complementary medicine in a healthy person reduces the risk of respiratory infections such as COVID.

An evidence gap exists between the effects of supplements in laboratory or animal studies and the findings of well-designed and conducted clinical trials. The ready access to unprescription supplements from myriad online and shopfront sources and the uncontrolled proliferation of claims that supplements can prevent or treat COVID symptoms have created a wealth of information about the pandemic. These claims are fueled by supplement manufacturers being able to get their products “listed” on the Australian Register of Medical Products despite limited evidence of safety or effectiveness.

Supplements can cause harm in the form of adverse effects and expenses.
This presence of official approval corresponds to the common misconception that ‘natural’ means ‘safe’. Supplements can cause harm in the form of adverse effects, drug interactions and expense. They also increase the burden of drugs on the patient, may delay more effective therapy, or give false hope to vulnerable people. The evidence does not guarantee that taking vitamins and supplements will protect you from contracting COVID or help you recover from infection.

Treasure McGuire, Assistant Director of Pharmacy, Mater Health SEQ Joint Appointment as Associate Professor of Pharmacology, Bond University and Associate Professor (Clinical), University of Queensland

About the author

Arindam

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: